How to Enjoy Your Stay at Hyams Beach New South Wales

A stay at Jervis Bay gets more awesome by enjoying the amazing hyams beach. There is much fun on this beautiful white sand beach. The beach is situated on the southern shore of Jervis Bay, a famous holiday spot on the South Coast.

Hyams is surrounded by awesome natural attractions such as Booderee National Park, Jervis Bay Marine Park, native forests and cliff top walking trails on headlands. It is also wedged between the beautiful Greenpatch and Murrays beaches.

There are various exciting things to do on this beach. Snorkeling and diving are some popular things to do during your stay. Beginner divers or experienced divers will enjoy exploring the sea floor. Snorkeling is exciting along the shorelines of the beach. Enjoy yourself by windsurfing, sailing, sea kayaking, surfing and other water activities in this idyllic beach. During your stay, enjoy swimming with your family and friends on the beautiful waters. Dolphin and whale watch cruises are also available in the nearby Huskisson.

The nearby Boodere National Park gives a choice for adventurous bushwalks admiring the nature. The walks and tours around the park are guided. The park has many cultural and historical features to see and learn. The white sands walks along the beach are enjoyable and give panoramic views to the Jervis Bay. There are fishing charters available for anyone want to catch a bite, a good way to go further than the wharf or beach.


You do not have to worry about Jervis accommodation. There is a wide range of accommodation styles to suit your budget. There are whalers', seaside cottages, glamorous modern homes or even old-style beach houses. All the houses have modern appliances for your comfortable stay.

However, you can search your accommodation according to the type you want, Choose among, these categories, self-contained rooms, bed & breakfast, hotels& motels, back packer & hostel, caravan & camping, resort or spas & retreats. All these accommodations are available to make sure you enjoy your stay in this place and come back again for another holiday.

The hotels in this area have positive customer reviews. Other than best accommodation, enjoy great meals and drinks in these hotels. Take pleasure in gourmet food and taste different brands of wine. The regular farmer's markets have gourmet goodies that are fresh while the wines are from family-owned wineries. Enjoy fresh seafood, juicy peaches, crisp apples, succulent organic figs and much more in restaurants and hotels. For more information about hotel and booking, visit http://www.jervisbayhotels.com.au/.

Continue reading

Book Review: Catching Fire, How Cooking Made us Human

It's the cooking stupid.

Stop worrying about what you're eating and listen up to Richard Wrangham, a biological anthropologist at Harvard, who hypothesizes that we evolved as humans once we started cooking our food.

Catching Fire, How Cooking Made us Human is not another fright book about our food, another wacko diet book, nor is it one of those unintelligible scientific studies. Wrangham writes the way a stream flows, inserting information without stopping for a lecture. Best of all he has a sense of humour.

He lays out his thesis without fanfare. In the fifties, eating meat was accepted as the impetus that pushed humans ahead of animals. In the sixties, the French anthropologist Claude Levi Strauss described cooking as providing humans with a psychological edge over animals.
Now Wrangham provides the biological view: "cooking (food ) increases the amount of energy our bodies obtain from our food."


This then is the key to our development. Cooking softens food, makes it easier to digest and so releases much needed energy, particularly to the brain. Our brains are only 2.5 percent of our body weight, but they are energy guzzlers, using around 20 percent of our energy budget. "Cooking" writes Wrangham "helped make our brains uniquely large providing a dull human body with brilliant human minds."

Brain grew, gut shriveled. Wrangham's account of our puny digestive system is hilarious, starting with the all important mouth. "Chimpanzees can open their mouths twice as far as humans, as they regularly do when eating. If a playful chimpanzee ever kissed you, you will never forget this point."

So where's the old caveman diet of grass? Raw food, a current fad, makes you healthier but you will have less energy, and life is mostly concerned with energy (women on raw food diets have been found to stop menstruating.) "So from an evolutionary perspective, if cooking causes a loss of vitamins or creates a few long term toxic compounds, the effect is relatively unimportant compared to the impact of more calories."

One of those toxic compounds, Acrylamide, one of the Maillard compounds which give food an appealing brown sheen, became the poster chemical in 2006 when it was found in commercially produced potato chips (among many other foods). Animal tests showed it to be carcinogenic. Dangerous to humans? 'The cooking hypothesis suggests that our long evolutionary history of exposure to Maillard compounds has led humans to be more resistant to their damaging effects than other mammals are."

Finally, the food industry hasn't plotted to kill us as so many food warriors insist. "Cooking launched a dietary commitment that today drives an industry. The popular foods cooking in giant factories are often scorned as lacking in micronutrient, having too much fat, salt, and sugar, and having too few interesting tastes, but they are the foods we have evolved to want." (italics mine).

So we eat too much of it. The result. Obesity. Question is how much should we scale back and return to eating indigestible foods? Won't we lose our energy?

It's up to the industry which, unlike nature, responds to our demands. That is if we make the demand.

Continue reading

For TIFF Visitors: Resto Guide

TIFF Guide to Restaurants ( will be added to daily...)

Toronto restaurants will get their biggest boost of the year during TIFF which opens this week. Visitors should have no trouble distinguishing Toronto from Vancouver or Montreal, neither which city has anything like the variety or substance or sheer entertainment of Toronto, which is a true melting pot of food. But be warned eager eater, you need advice to know where to go and how much it's gonna cost, and how easy it is to find....and so on....which are the show places, where the good deals, which restaurants are uniquely Toronto.....

The following list will be updated regularly....all opinions are my own, most taken from published reviews.... Prices$ - cheap. $$ entree under 20 $$$ entree over 20
New! Ame, 19 Mercer St. 416 599 7246. a block from the Bell Lightbox. The Rubino Brothers makeover of Rain (Ame) is a shogun's palace with jujube cocktails, a eurotake on Japanese food, shared plates, great fish on the mellow robrata grill, $$(Reviewed Sept 12)


New! Liberty Noodle 171 East Liberty St. 15 mins from downtown, south of King. cab it. 416.588.4100 Looks like a commissary a Chinese assembly line. Still soft opening, no liquor yet, lunch only.

Lucien, 36 Wellington E. 416-504-9990, six blocks crosstown from BL. Elegant MOR with mild molecular influence, meat, veg sourced locally. Bar scene. Price$$$

Frank at Art Gallery of Ontario 317 Dundas Street W. 416-979-8888. Few blocks n. of BL. Eclectic menus emphasizing fresh/local for weekend brunch, weekday lunch and dinner. $$$ Basement caff a downer.

C 5 at Royal Ontario Museum,100 Queen's Park, 416-586-7928, ck website for hours. cab from BL. Green gastronomy, local sourcing, fusion twinge. $$$ Basement caff if you like sight of walking legs.

Sidecar Bar and Grill, 577 College, 416-536-7000. cab from BL. Unpretentious food, dinner, gt service. Grilled steak.salmon, weekday prix fixe $24.plus cocktails. $

Mildred's Temple Kitchen ,85 Hanna Ave 416-588-5695, ten min cab from BL. Space station feeling with all over the map menus, burgers to pork and beans and up..lunch, dinner, weekend brunch. E $$-$$$

Lakes restaurant and wine bar, 1112 Yonge. 416-966-0185. Cab or Yonge subway to Rosedale, walk few blocks no. Pleasant Asian take on bistro faves $$

Trio ristorante and pizzeria, 3239 Yonge St 416-486-5786. Cab or Yonge subway to Lawrence, walk no 3 blocks. Naples in Toronto, the only authentic Neapolitan pizza, famous also for gnocchi. $

Le Gourmand, Hudson Bay food court (underneath store, by subway) LG3 32177 Yonge St. @ Eglinton on Yonge subway.$ pastrymeister/panini in trench cafe, 152Spadina (adelaide) 416-504-4499

Far Niente 187 Bay St (416) 214-9922.$$$ Glossy slick bay street broker destination with MOR menu delivered with flair. Batifole Bistro 744 Gerrard Street East(416) 462-9965 $$ cab it. Excellent French cooking on modest scale.
Madeline's, 601 King Street West (416) 603-2205 $$ 10 mins from Lightbox. Sophisticated Eurofusion on shared plates

Continue reading

Women Chefs: Don’t Grumble!

Angela Hartnett

grumble, grumble, grumble go North American female chefs — the airwaves buzz with complaints about sexism, how women are overlooked as chefs, that men get all the awards etc…

Angela Hartnett, one of Britain’s top chefs, says it’s not true in today’s Guardian.

As a female chef, I’ve been asked about sexism so many times I’m almost bored with the question. And to be honest, in over 20 years in the industry I’ve never experienced any kind of sexism. The male chefs I know are happy to have women in their kitchen.

Anyway, there’s inequality everywhere. Last year I filmed a TV show, and there was only one woman on the crew. The idea that it’s just catering, or it’s worse in this industry, is not right.”

Continue reading

Blame the Architects!

Luma is just the latest restaurant to be opened in a cultural institution - without making reference to its context. It could be a restaurant anywhere. There's no reason for it to be in TIFF Bell Lightbox. Why?

Elsewhere, restaurants in museums are tailored to exploit their context. You dine at The Modern in MoMA, eat three-star food, and look out over the sculpture garden.

At the Metropolitan, diners in the Petrie Court....

At the British Museum, the Court restaurant is right under the great dome. But in Toronto....

You wouldn't know that JK at the Gardiner belongs in the same space as the enchanting ceramics museum. Ditto ROM's CS. Last time I was there, a functionary pointed out to me how environmentally conscious the museum was, there would be gardens on the roofs. Get over it. I can get that anywhere. Why aren't some of the museum's remarkable artifacts on display? Gosh, the restaurant's big enough. Of course, like poor Luma, CS is difficult to actually find.


The best of the lot is Frank at the AGO where art is on display. But the design! It's a jungle jim which has customers and waiters interacting rather too closely. Great idea to have Frank's entrance on the street but the trouble is who knew? I've walked past it several times without noticing. No wonder it's not picking up many diners from the general public. Apparently it's take went down this past summer when an exhibition bombed.

Blame the architects. KMPB, Daniel Liebeskind, Frank Gehry for making a restaurant in their image rather than putting it in the context of the institution. Blame the boards of directors for their edifice complex - a fancy building is all. No thought about what's inside.

Continue reading

How to Enjoy Your Stay at Hyams Beach New South Wales

A stay at Jervis Bay gets more awesome by enjoying the amazing hyams beach. There is much fun on this beautiful white sand beach. The beach is situated on the southern shore of Jervis Bay, a famous holiday spot on the South Coast.

Hyams is surrounded by awesome natural attractions such as Booderee National Park, Jervis Bay Marine Park, native forests and cliff top walking trails on headlands. It is also wedged between the beautiful Greenpatch and Murrays beaches.

There are various exciting things to do on this beach. Snorkeling and diving are some popular things to do during your stay. Beginner divers or experienced divers will enjoy exploring the sea floor. Snorkeling is exciting along the shorelines of the beach. Enjoy yourself by windsurfing, sailing, sea kayaking, surfing and other water activities in this idyllic beach. During your stay, enjoy swimming with your family and friends on the beautiful waters. Dolphin and whale watch cruises are also available in the nearby Huskisson.

The nearby Boodere National Park gives a choice for adventurous bushwalks admiring the nature. The walks and tours around the park are guided. The park has many cultural and historical features to see and learn. The white sands walks along the beach are enjoyable and give panoramic views to the Jervis Bay. There are fishing charters available for anyone want to catch a bite, a good way to go further than the wharf or beach.


You do not have to worry about Jervis accommodation. There is a wide range of accommodation styles to suit your budget. There are whalers', seaside cottages, glamorous modern homes or even old-style beach houses. All the houses have modern appliances for your comfortable stay.

However, you can search your accommodation according to the type you want, Choose among, these categories, self-contained rooms, bed & breakfast, hotels& motels, back packer & hostel, caravan & camping, resort or spas & retreats. All these accommodations are available to make sure you enjoy your stay in this place and come back again for another holiday.

The hotels in this area have positive customer reviews. Other than best accommodation, enjoy great meals and drinks in these hotels. Take pleasure in gourmet food and taste different brands of wine. The regular farmer's markets have gourmet goodies that are fresh while the wines are from family-owned wineries. Enjoy fresh seafood, juicy peaches, crisp apples, succulent organic figs and much more in restaurants and hotels. For more information about hotel and booking, visit http://www.jervisbayhotels.com.au/.

Book Review: Catching Fire, How Cooking Made us Human

It's the cooking stupid.

Stop worrying about what you're eating and listen up to Richard Wrangham, a biological anthropologist at Harvard, who hypothesizes that we evolved as humans once we started cooking our food.

Catching Fire, How Cooking Made us Human is not another fright book about our food, another wacko diet book, nor is it one of those unintelligible scientific studies. Wrangham writes the way a stream flows, inserting information without stopping for a lecture. Best of all he has a sense of humour.

He lays out his thesis without fanfare. In the fifties, eating meat was accepted as the impetus that pushed humans ahead of animals. In the sixties, the French anthropologist Claude Levi Strauss described cooking as providing humans with a psychological edge over animals.
Now Wrangham provides the biological view: "cooking (food ) increases the amount of energy our bodies obtain from our food."


This then is the key to our development. Cooking softens food, makes it easier to digest and so releases much needed energy, particularly to the brain. Our brains are only 2.5 percent of our body weight, but they are energy guzzlers, using around 20 percent of our energy budget. "Cooking" writes Wrangham "helped make our brains uniquely large providing a dull human body with brilliant human minds."

Brain grew, gut shriveled. Wrangham's account of our puny digestive system is hilarious, starting with the all important mouth. "Chimpanzees can open their mouths twice as far as humans, as they regularly do when eating. If a playful chimpanzee ever kissed you, you will never forget this point."

So where's the old caveman diet of grass? Raw food, a current fad, makes you healthier but you will have less energy, and life is mostly concerned with energy (women on raw food diets have been found to stop menstruating.) "So from an evolutionary perspective, if cooking causes a loss of vitamins or creates a few long term toxic compounds, the effect is relatively unimportant compared to the impact of more calories."

One of those toxic compounds, Acrylamide, one of the Maillard compounds which give food an appealing brown sheen, became the poster chemical in 2006 when it was found in commercially produced potato chips (among many other foods). Animal tests showed it to be carcinogenic. Dangerous to humans? 'The cooking hypothesis suggests that our long evolutionary history of exposure to Maillard compounds has led humans to be more resistant to their damaging effects than other mammals are."

Finally, the food industry hasn't plotted to kill us as so many food warriors insist. "Cooking launched a dietary commitment that today drives an industry. The popular foods cooking in giant factories are often scorned as lacking in micronutrient, having too much fat, salt, and sugar, and having too few interesting tastes, but they are the foods we have evolved to want." (italics mine).

So we eat too much of it. The result. Obesity. Question is how much should we scale back and return to eating indigestible foods? Won't we lose our energy?

It's up to the industry which, unlike nature, responds to our demands. That is if we make the demand.

For TIFF Visitors: Resto Guide

TIFF Guide to Restaurants ( will be added to daily...)

Toronto restaurants will get their biggest boost of the year during TIFF which opens this week. Visitors should have no trouble distinguishing Toronto from Vancouver or Montreal, neither which city has anything like the variety or substance or sheer entertainment of Toronto, which is a true melting pot of food. But be warned eager eater, you need advice to know where to go and how much it's gonna cost, and how easy it is to find....and so on....which are the show places, where the good deals, which restaurants are uniquely Toronto.....

The following list will be updated regularly....all opinions are my own, most taken from published reviews.... Prices$ - cheap. $$ entree under 20 $$$ entree over 20
New! Ame, 19 Mercer St. 416 599 7246. a block from the Bell Lightbox. The Rubino Brothers makeover of Rain (Ame) is a shogun's palace with jujube cocktails, a eurotake on Japanese food, shared plates, great fish on the mellow robrata grill, $$(Reviewed Sept 12)


New! Liberty Noodle 171 East Liberty St. 15 mins from downtown, south of King. cab it. 416.588.4100 Looks like a commissary a Chinese assembly line. Still soft opening, no liquor yet, lunch only.

Lucien, 36 Wellington E. 416-504-9990, six blocks crosstown from BL. Elegant MOR with mild molecular influence, meat, veg sourced locally. Bar scene. Price$$$

Frank at Art Gallery of Ontario 317 Dundas Street W. 416-979-8888. Few blocks n. of BL. Eclectic menus emphasizing fresh/local for weekend brunch, weekday lunch and dinner. $$$ Basement caff a downer.

C 5 at Royal Ontario Museum,100 Queen's Park, 416-586-7928, ck website for hours. cab from BL. Green gastronomy, local sourcing, fusion twinge. $$$ Basement caff if you like sight of walking legs.

Sidecar Bar and Grill, 577 College, 416-536-7000. cab from BL. Unpretentious food, dinner, gt service. Grilled steak.salmon, weekday prix fixe $24.plus cocktails. $

Mildred's Temple Kitchen ,85 Hanna Ave 416-588-5695, ten min cab from BL. Space station feeling with all over the map menus, burgers to pork and beans and up..lunch, dinner, weekend brunch. E $$-$$$

Lakes restaurant and wine bar, 1112 Yonge. 416-966-0185. Cab or Yonge subway to Rosedale, walk few blocks no. Pleasant Asian take on bistro faves $$

Trio ristorante and pizzeria, 3239 Yonge St 416-486-5786. Cab or Yonge subway to Lawrence, walk no 3 blocks. Naples in Toronto, the only authentic Neapolitan pizza, famous also for gnocchi. $

Le Gourmand, Hudson Bay food court (underneath store, by subway) LG3 32177 Yonge St. @ Eglinton on Yonge subway.$ pastrymeister/panini in trench cafe, 152Spadina (adelaide) 416-504-4499

Far Niente 187 Bay St (416) 214-9922.$$$ Glossy slick bay street broker destination with MOR menu delivered with flair. Batifole Bistro 744 Gerrard Street East(416) 462-9965 $$ cab it. Excellent French cooking on modest scale.
Madeline's, 601 King Street West (416) 603-2205 $$ 10 mins from Lightbox. Sophisticated Eurofusion on shared plates

Women Chefs: Don’t Grumble!

Angela Hartnett

grumble, grumble, grumble go North American female chefs — the airwaves buzz with complaints about sexism, how women are overlooked as chefs, that men get all the awards etc…

Angela Hartnett, one of Britain’s top chefs, says it’s not true in today’s Guardian.

As a female chef, I’ve been asked about sexism so many times I’m almost bored with the question. And to be honest, in over 20 years in the industry I’ve never experienced any kind of sexism. The male chefs I know are happy to have women in their kitchen.

Anyway, there’s inequality everywhere. Last year I filmed a TV show, and there was only one woman on the crew. The idea that it’s just catering, or it’s worse in this industry, is not right.”


There are now ll Michelin-starred female chefs, and Hartnett suggests that “there are far more female head chefs out there than most people realize.”

“And I think we will continue to see that rise. Partly this is because the industry now has so much more exposure, with female chefs on TV or writing about food and their restaurants being more successful. Being a chef is seen as a skilled job. And the hours have become more approachable. You’d get two days off a week. Now you get three days…it had to change, people wanted a life. The pay has increased as well, which has probably made a difference to the number of women entering the profession.”

Isn’t it rather insulting to have to insert the word woman before chef anyway. Either he or she is good or not. For the record, Toronto has several top chefs who happen to be women: Lynn Crawford,Anne Yarymowich, Suzanne Baby….

Blame the Architects!

Luma is just the latest restaurant to be opened in a cultural institution - without making reference to its context. It could be a restaurant anywhere. There's no reason for it to be in TIFF Bell Lightbox. Why?

Elsewhere, restaurants in museums are tailored to exploit their context. You dine at The Modern in MoMA, eat three-star food, and look out over the sculpture garden.

At the Metropolitan, diners in the Petrie Court....

At the British Museum, the Court restaurant is right under the great dome. But in Toronto....

You wouldn't know that JK at the Gardiner belongs in the same space as the enchanting ceramics museum. Ditto ROM's CS. Last time I was there, a functionary pointed out to me how environmentally conscious the museum was, there would be gardens on the roofs. Get over it. I can get that anywhere. Why aren't some of the museum's remarkable artifacts on display? Gosh, the restaurant's big enough. Of course, like poor Luma, CS is difficult to actually find.


The best of the lot is Frank at the AGO where art is on display. But the design! It's a jungle jim which has customers and waiters interacting rather too closely. Great idea to have Frank's entrance on the street but the trouble is who knew? I've walked past it several times without noticing. No wonder it's not picking up many diners from the general public. Apparently it's take went down this past summer when an exhibition bombed.

Blame the architects. KMPB, Daniel Liebeskind, Frank Gehry for making a restaurant in their image rather than putting it in the context of the institution. Blame the boards of directors for their edifice complex - a fancy building is all. No thought about what's inside.